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March 2022

Tuesday, 29 March 2022 00:00

Reminder: When Was the Last Time...?

Custom orthotics, or shoe inserts, should be periodically replaced. Orthotics must fit properly to give you the best results. Protect your feet and ankles!

Tuesday, 29 March 2022 00:00

The Early Stages of a Bunion

If you are feeling anything unusual in your big toe joint, such as tenderness, warmth, swelling, stiffness, pain, or limited range of motion, you may be in the beginning stages of developing a bunion. It takes years for a bunion to fully form, so your condition may not have progressed to the point where you can see the telltale bony bump on the outside of your big toe, nor the big toe bending unnaturally towards the other toes. Do you wear high heels or narrow, tight shoes regularly? Have you suffered a foot injury? Do you have arthritis, a neuromuscular disorder, or a family history of bunions? Any of these factors may put you more at risk of developing a painful bunion. It is important to seek treatment early for a bunion because it can help halt the progression of the condition, give your podiatrist more options for correcting the deformity, and avoid long-lasting complications. If you suspect you are developing—or have developed—a bunion, it is wise to call a podiatrist to examine, diagnose, and treat your condition.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Milos Tomich, DPM of Dr. Tomich Foot & Ankle Health Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Milwaukee and Wauwatosa, WI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions

Cuboid syndrome occurs when the cuboid bone—located on the outer side of the foot, between the heel and the pinky toe—shifts out of its normal position. This typically occurs abruptly, sometimes along with an ankle sprain, or by landing on a hard surface. Sometimes wearing high heels or shoes that do not fit correctly or failing to stretch the feet properly before physical activity can cause cuboid syndrome, as well as certain conditions such as having flat feet or tendon problems. Cuboid syndrome can cause pain, tenderness, swelling, and weakness on the outside of the middle of the foot and may even prevent normal movement of the foot. If you are experiencing these types of symptoms, see a podiatrist for an examination and diagnosis. If you do have cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist can treat it through physical therapy, taping, bracing, or in some cases—after swelling and pain have lessened—a maneuver called the cuboid whip to help guide your cuboid bone back into position.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Milos Tomich, DPM from Dr. Tomich Foot & Ankle Health Center. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Milwaukee and Wauwatosa, WI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about All About Cuboid Syndrome
Tuesday, 15 March 2022 00:00

Ways to Deal With Toenail Fungus

When a fungal infection develops in your toenails the effects are usually easy to spot. The toenail typically changes both in color and consistency – appearing thickened, yellowish, crusty, and brittle. Several anti-fungal creams are available over the counter, although they may take many months to eradicate the infection. Nail-softening creams can allow you to scrape off the infection, though caution is recommended because fungal infections are highly transmissible and can spread to other parts of your body, such as your fingernails. In the meantime, try to keep your feet clean and dry, avoid sharing towels, change your socks daily, and wear protective foot coverings in locker rooms, pools, and showers. If the infection persists or worsens, it’s a good idea to consult a podiatrist who can prescribe stronger medication, check if any underlying conditions may be exacerbating the infection, and determine further treatment options.

For more information about treatment, contact Milos Tomich, DPM of Dr. Tomich Foot & Ankle Health Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Toenail Fungus Treatment

Toenail fungus is a condition that affects many people and can be especially hard to get rid of. Fortunately, there are several methods to go about treating and avoiding it.

Antifungals & Deterrence

Oral antifungal medicine has been shown to be effective in many cases. It is important to consult with a podiatrist to determine the proper regiment for you, or potentially explore other options.

Applying foot powder on the feet and shoes helps keep the feet free of moisture and sweat.

Sandals or open toed shoes – Wearing these will allow air movement and help keep feet dry. They also expose your feet to light, which fungus cannot tolerate. Socks with moisture wicking material also help as well.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Milwaukee and Wauwatosa, WI . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Treating Toenail Fungus
Tuesday, 08 March 2022 00:00

The Achilles Tendon, Walking and Running

The function of the Achilles tendon is to attach the ankle joint to the heel bone. It is located in the back of the calf and is crucial to performing daily activities that include walking and running. An indication that a patient has experienced an Achilles tendon injury is often intense pain in the lower part of the calf. Additional symptoms can include hearing and feeling a sudden snap, and a difficulty pointing and flexing the foot. Patients may experience swelling and bruising surrounding the ankle, and standing on tiptoes is often impossible to do. Research has shown that having pre-existing medical conditions may lead to enduring this type of injury. These can include kidney failure, thyroid disease, and diabetes. There are several treatment options available for an Achilles tendon injury, and it is suggested that you confer with a podiatrist who can determine what the best one is for you.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact Milos Tomich, DPM of Dr. Tomich Foot & Ankle Health Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Milwaukee and Wauwatosa, WI . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What are Achilles Tendon Injuries

Heel pain is a very common occurrence. It is usually felt under the heel or at the back of the heel. When pain and inflammation is located on the bottom of the heel toward the front of the foot, plantar fasciitis is typically the cause. Plantar fasciitis is a painful inflammation of the plantar fascia tissue, which runs along the bottom of the foot and connects the heel with the toes. Other causes of heel pain on the bottom of the foot may be attributed to heel pad atrophy or heel spurs. If pain is felt at the back of the heel, Achilles tendonitis is often at the root of the cause. This condition occurs when the Achilles tendon, which attaches to the back of the heel bone, becomes damaged or torn over time, causing pain and swelling. Other possible causes include bursitis, Sever’s disease, and heel bumps. Pain from a heel stress fracture can occur anywhere on the heel, and tarsal tunnel syndrome can cause heel pain underneath the ankle bone. Heel pain can also be caused by neurological issues, infections and arthritis. Unless you suffer an acute injury, heel pain typically starts out mild, but can become severe. If you are experiencing any type of heel pain, don’t hesitate to contact a podiatrist to find out the cause and take measures to keep it from worsening or becoming chronic or debilitating.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact Milos Tomich, DPM of Dr. Tomich Foot & Ankle Health Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in Milwaukee and Wauwatosa, WI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Heel Pain
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