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February 2022

Sunday, 27 February 2022 00:00

Do You Suffer From Painful Feet?

Painful deformities, such as hammertoes, can be treated. Stop living with foot pain, and have beautiful feet again!

Wednesday, 23 February 2022 00:00

When It Feels Like You Are Walking on a Pebble

When a digital nerve leading to the toes becomes repetitively irritated, thickened scar tissue can form around it—entrapping the nerve and causing pain or numbness in the ball of the foot, or the feeling that you are walking on a marble or pebble. This condition is known as Morton’s neuroma—a condition named after a 19th-century American surgeon, Thomas George Morton. Morton’s neuroma most commonly occurs between the third and fourth toes, although it can also affect the nerve running between the second and third toes. Morton’s neuroma can often be caused by wearing shoes that are narrow or tight in the toe box and squeeze the toes together. A podiatrist may treat Morton’s neuroma with a variety of methods to offload pressure on the irritated nerve, along with icing and resting, custom orthotics and shoe modifications, and anti-inflammatory medications. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to relieve pain and help the nerve to heal.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Milos Tomich, DPM of Dr. Tomich Foot & Ankle Health Center. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Milwaukee and Wauwatosa, WI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 15 February 2022 00:00

Chronic Dull Pain Under Your Big Toe Joint

Joints predominantly connect bones with each other. Sesamoid bones, however, do not connect to other bones; they are small, oval shaped bones embedded within tendons. Sesamoid bones are found in the knees and hands, and two are located underneath the big toe joint of the foot. This pair of hardworking sesamoids plays a vital role in bearing weight and movement. Sesamoids help the big toe move and push off forcefully when walking and running, and they act as shock absorbers for the long metatarsal bone in the forefoot that attaches to the big toe. Physical activities such as football, basketball, running, tennis and ballet can apply excessive pressure on the ball of the foot and cause various injuries to the sesamoids and surrounding tissue and tendons. Sesamoiditis is one such injury. Sesamoiditis is a chronic inflammation of the sesamoid bones and tendons that can produce a fluctuating dull pain under the big toe joint. There are several types of treatment—both conservative and surgical (if necessary)—that your podiatrist can go over with you if you are diagnosed with sesamoiditis.

Sesamoiditis is an unpleasant foot condition characterized by pain in the balls of the feet. If you think you’re struggling with sesamoiditis, contact Milos Tomich, DPM of Dr. Tomich Foot & Ankle Health Center. Our doctor will treat your condition thoroughly and effectively.

Sesamoiditis

Sesamoiditis is a condition of the foot that affects the ball of the foot. It is more common in younger people than it is in older people. It can also occur with people who have begun a new exercise program, since their bodies are adjusting to the new physical regimen. Pain may also be caused by the inflammation of tendons surrounding the bones. It is important to seek treatment in its early stages because if you ignore the pain, this condition can lead to more serious problems such as severe irritation and bone fractures.

Causes of Sesamoiditis

  • Sudden increase in activity
  • Increase in physically strenuous movement without a proper warm up or build up
  • Foot structure: those who have smaller, bonier feet or those with a high arch may be more susceptible

Treatment for sesamoiditis is non-invasive and simple. Doctors may recommend a strict rest period where the patient forgoes most physical activity. This will help give the patient time to heal their feet through limited activity. For serious cases, it is best to speak with your doctor to determine a treatment option that will help your specific needs.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Milwaukee and Wauwatosa, WI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Sesamoiditis
Tuesday, 08 February 2022 00:00

Diabetic Feet Are at Risk

If you have diabetes, you may be more likely to develop various foot conditions. Due to chronically high blood sugar levels, diabetic patients may experience nerve damage in their feet, poor circulation, or an impaired immune system. These complications can lead to diabetic foot ulcers (wounds that heal poorly on the lower limbs) which can become infected when left unnoticed. People with diabetes are also more susceptible to develop corns, calluses, and cracked heels due to the skin on the feet becoming dry. Foot deformities like hammertoes and bunions, and infections like athlete’s foot and fungal toenails, can also be common among people with diabetes. If you have diabetes, it is strongly suggested that you check your feet regularly for any abnormalities. If you notice anything out of the ordinary, please seek the care of a podiatrist as soon as possible.    

Diabetic foot care is important in preventing foot ailments such as ulcers. If you are suffering from diabetes or have any other concerns about your feet, contact Milos Tomich, DPM from Dr. Tomich Foot & Ankle Health Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Diabetic Foot Care

Diabetes affects millions of people every year. The condition can damage blood vessels in many parts of the body, especially the feet. Because of this, taking care of your feet is essential if you have diabetes, and having a podiatrist help monitor your foot health is highly recommended.

The Importance of Caring for Your Feet

  • Routinely inspect your feet for bruises or sores.
  • Wear socks that fit your feet comfortably.
  • Wear comfortable shoes that provide adequate support.

Patients with diabetes should have their doctor monitor their blood levels, as blood sugar levels play such a huge role in diabetic care. Monitoring these levels on a regular basis is highly advised.

It is always best to inform your healthcare professional of any concerns you may have regarding your feet, especially for diabetic patients. Early treatment and routine foot examinations are keys to maintaining proper health, especially because severe complications can arise if proper treatment is not applied.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Milwaukee and Wauwatosa, WI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 01 February 2022 00:00

What to Do if You Break a Toe

A broken toe usually involves something heavy dropping on it or stubbing it on a piece of furniture or another hard surface. The result is bruising and swelling that makes it difficult or impossible to wear shoes due to the pain. Frequently, the patient walks with a limp if they can walk at all. It can take up to 6 weeks for a broken toe to fully heal. Here are a few measures you can implement at home to help with the healing process. First, stay off the foot, and then wrap it to keep the swelling down. Keep ice on the affected toe and elevate it as often as possible. You also may need to take over-the-counter pain medication. Whether your toe is broken or sprained, it is a good idea to consult a podiatrist who can determine the severity of the injury. The foot specialist will take an X-ray and depending on the results, wrap the injured toe to toe next to it (known as buddy taping) as a splint for stabilization. A hard boot may be prescribed to keep the toe safe from further injury. Walking aids, such as crutches, may also be recommended to help keep weight off the toe. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

A broken toe can be very painful and lead to complications if not properly fixed. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Milos Tomich, DPM from Dr. Tomich Foot & Ankle Health Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What to Know About a Broken Toe

Although most people try to avoid foot trauma such as banging, stubbing, or dropping heavy objects on their feet, the unfortunate fact is that it is a common occurrence. Given the fact that toes are positioned in front of the feet, they typically sustain the brunt of such trauma. When trauma occurs to a toe, the result can be a painful break (fracture).

Symptoms of a Broken Toe

  • Throbbing pain
  • Swelling
  • Bruising on the skin and toenail
  • The inability to move the toe
  • Toe appears crooked or disfigured
  • Tingling or numbness in the toe

Generally, it is best to stay off of the injured toe with the affected foot elevated.

Severe toe fractures may be treated with a splint, cast, and in some cases, minor surgery. Due to its position and the pressure it endures with daily activity, future complications can occur if the big toe is not properly treated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Milwaukee and Wauwatosa, WI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What to Know About a Broken Toe
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